On Display

My wife is kind enough to allow me to keep some models and action figures on display in the living room/dining room. In the far corners are some of my aircraft models on a pair of Ikea curio cabinets bracing the window.The big entertainment unit on the left wall has a mix of models I built, with action figures and die cast vehicles.

Here are the Hutch units close up (actually, the left one is Starsky) - The left hand unit is various World War Two aircraft and modern jets. Up on top is the ol' "Cannonball" O-gauge train my great-grandfather built, serving out its retirement.

These hutch units came with only three shelves each, and I "upgraded" them by adding some custom-cut glass shelves.

And hey, how about that antique "Mister Machine" toy?


The right hand shelf is all Nazi, all the time. WWII "Luft '46" models, plus some actually-built WWII German planes. A fairly even mix of 1/72 and 1/48 (but never on the same shelf!). The middle wood shelf is all different marks of Messerschmitt-109s.

Note the Dickle "Saurian Brandy" bottle on the top shelf! It's an original, but the leather is in poor shape.

The train is Great-Grandpa's Scratch-built O-Gauge Camelback.


Moving on to my computer room...

Yeah, it's a mess. I'm a guy.

(Below) My kitbashed starships are all on shelves right in front of me as I surf the Star Trek bboards.

(Below) Behind me, an ecclectic assortment of sci fi ships and figures looms. Okay, it's a big mess. That's the 12" Mr. spock action figure from ST:TMP on the top shelf, and a very old 12" Spidey. On top of the right hand glass cabinet is another of Great-Grandpa's O-Gauge locomotives, a rather huge 2-6-6-2 articulated Mallet. The two glass cabinets were surplussed at work and I got them for free. They're a natural for keeping my figure models dust-free.

The glass shelves were donated by HiWay Hobby House as they went out of business. So I have a little piece of HHH here at home.

(Below) On the other end of the room is my drawing board (which, sadly, doesn't get used much any more), and - yes - more shelves! Some more aircraft and random models on the far wall, and the shelves over the board are for the "canon" and "fanon" Star Trek ships, including resin kits and Polar Lights Enterprise conversions.

Again, I've gone for maximum wall coverage with room for more models. And I'm still running out of space!.

(Below) A closeup of the Trek-only shelves over the drawing board.
Top shelf: All Klingons all the time.
Second shelf: All 1/1400 scale Trek ships.
Third shelf: 1/1000 scale Franz Joseph ST Tech Manual conversions of the Polar Lights Enterprise.
Bottom shelf: 1/1000 kits and conversions from various fan publications (plus the Jenolen).

(Below) A bookshelf and cabinet divide the room, and I've made myself this handy little display shelf to go on top.
I rotate the models displayed there to keep myself entertained.


The Stockpiles!
A true modeler never wants to be without a kit to build. Okay, maybe I go a bit too far.

Viewed from the door: From my workbench on the right (with essential TV/DVD/Cable), the sci fi section extends to the back of the room. On the right side of the room are the airplane models. Way in the back, under the workbench, are some extra Star Wars kits.

The view from the back of the room, looking towards the door.

The airplane section in fisheyed detail

The Sci-Fi section

It even extends around the back corner, by the furnace.

Up in the attic, my stash of Star Trek kits that I bought up when Ertl announced it had dropped the Trek license. Most of these are destined for kitbashing into rilly kewl new starships. Yeah, I overdid this too.


But that's not all - I have many boxes of "extra" model kits in storage in the basement and the attic - doubles that I bought to build multiple versions; old kits that I don't feel like building any more. At my last calculations, bulding an average of one model per month, I need to live to be 200 to finish them all. Meh; it's a hobby.
Back to Models
Back to InPayne